Upcoming Events

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Observing the leptonic flavour breaking scale at colliders and direct searches -- Jessica Turner

Nov 26, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

202 Physics Bldg.

Host: Jack Laiho/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

The observed pattern of mixing in the neutrino sector may be explained by the presence of a non-Abelian, discrete flavour symmetry broken into residual subgroups at low energies. These flavour models require the presence of Standard Model singlet scalars, namely flavons, which can promptly decay to charged leptons in a  flavour-conserving or violating manner.  In this talk, I will present the constraints on the model parameters of an A4 leptonic flavour model using a synergy of g-2, charged lepton flavour conversion and collider data. The most powerful constraints derive from  the MEG collaboration's result on mu to e gamma and the reinterpretation of an 8 TeV ATLAS search for anomalous productions of multi-leptonic final states.

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The Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities: US Nuclear Weapons Policy: 'Time for the Concerned Public to Intervene Again' by Dr. Frank von Hippel

Nov 29, 2018, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

SHAFFER ART BLDG AUDITORIUM

Coordinator: Prof. Simon Catterall. Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton

The last massive intervention by the concerned public in U.S. nuclear weapons policy was by the grassroots Nuclear Weapons Freeze Movement and its European counterpart in the early 1980s. One result was to shift the U.S. government from insisting that the Soviet Union believed it possible to fight and win a nuclear war, and therefore so must we; to repeated joint summit statements by Presidents Gorbachev and Reagan that “nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought.” More tangibly, the result was a reduction in the global stock of nuclear warheads from about 65,000 in 1991 to about 10,000 today. The effect has worn off, however, and two separate but related nuclear arms races have begun: between the U.S. and Russia and the U.S. and China, plus proliferation crises with the “rogue” states, North Korea and Iran. The perverse dynamics underlying these crises will be explained and possible initiatives to mitigate them will be discussed, including a:


• U.S. no-first use policy,
• Restoration of limits on ineffective but provocative ballistic missile defenses,
• Resumption of US-Russian nuclear reductions along with a cap on China’s nuclear buildup,
and
• Strengthening the nonproliferation regime with bans on the separation of plutonium and on
national uranium enrichment capabilities.


Finally, the effectiveness of activist citizens teamed up with scientists for “credibility” working to educate Congress – as in the “Freeze” movement – will be recounted.

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Talk by Nick & Merrill

Nov 30, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

202 Physics Bldg.

Host: Judah

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New simulations and observations of highly-complex molecules in star-forming regions by Robin Garrod

Dec 6, 2018, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Gianfranco Vidali, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

The interstellar medium (ISM) is replete with molecules, and high-mass star-formation regions in particular are host to some of the most complex organic molecules yet detected outside of our solar system. Millimeter/sub-millimeter wavelength spectral data from the ALMA telescope allows us to explore the chemistry of such regions in much greater detail than ever before. The ALMA 3mm line survey EMoCA ("Exploring Molecular Complexity with ALMA") of the chemically-rich Galactic Center source Sagittarius B2(N) has not only identified several new molecules in that source, but has led to the identification of new molecule-rich hot cores - a total of five are now known to exist in Sgr B2(N).

 

I will give a brief overview of the molecular detections made by EMoCA toward Sgr B2(N). I will also present chemical kinetics models of the coupled gas-phase and grain-surface/ice-mantle chemistry occurring in Sgr B2(N) related to these molecules, with an emphasis on the treatment of the recently-detected branched carbon-chain molecule iso-propyl cyanide (i-C3H7CN). I will assess the possibilities for the presence and detectability of other branched carbon-chain molecules in the ISM. I will also present recent work that uses complex molecule abundances to constrain the cosmic-ray ionization rates and chemical timescales within different hot cores.

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Talk by Raghav

Dec 7, 2018, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

202 Physics Bldg.

Host: Judah

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TBA by Crystal Bailey

Feb 21, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Steven Blusk, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

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TBA by Kirsten Tollefson

Mar 7, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof. Steven Blusk, Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

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TBD by Kate Scholberg

Apr 4, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Denver Whittington. Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton - phyadmin@syr.edu

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TBD by Kerstin Nordstrom

Apr 25, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof.Joseph Paulsen/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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TBD by Kerstin Nordstrom

Apr 26, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof.Joseph Paulsen/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960

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TBD by Mark Trodden

Sep 19, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

Room: 202/204 Physics Bldg.

Host: Prof.Steven Blusk/ Contact: Yudaisy Salomón Sargentón, 315-443-5960