Upcoming Events

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Prashali

Sep 23, 2019, 2:00 PM-3:00 PM

204 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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Einstein and Bose by Kameshwar Wali

Sep 26, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

202 and 204 Physics Building

Title: "Einstein and Bose" by Kamesh Wali

Abstract: The story I am going I am going to talk about is one of the most exciting episode of the 30th century physics. It has all the twists and and turns and ironies of failed attempts on the part of some of the great physicists of the period and the success of a relatively unknown young man from Dacca University in East Bengal, India. It involved a great struggle , great many philosophical issues assocoaated with the fundamental nature of matter and radiation. It involves above all a a dramatic confrontation between thery and experiment.

Contact: Yudaisy Salomon Sargenton at phyadmin@syr.edu

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James Puckett, Gettysburg College: Mechanics of collective animal behavior

Sep 27, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

202 Physics Building

James Puckett, Gettysburg College

Host: Julia Giannini

 

Title:

Mechanics of collective animal behavior

 

Abstract:

As social organisms, we are fascinated by the complex and coherent behavior of other social organisms. How do animals (such as butterflies, geese, and salmon) navigate during long migrations without any leaders?  How do groups of animals respond to their environment and make decisions collectively?  From bacteria to insects, fish, birds and humans, collective behavior is a strategy that nature has chosen to solve many diverse complex problems such as navigating, foraging, avoiding predators and making decisions. Collective behavior emerges from low-level interactions between individuals.  While there are several models that successfully describe qualitative features of collective structures in animal behavior, the dynamical behavior of these systems in response to perturbation is not well understood.  In this talk, I discuss results of recent experiments to better understand collective behavior from a physicist point of view.

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The Kameshwar C. Wali Lecture in the Sciences and Humanities: Widening the Circle: Indigenous Knowledge on the Personhood of All Beings and Justice for the Land

Oct 3, 2019, 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Peter Graham Scholarly Commons, 114 Bird Library

Abstract: As distinguished guest lecturer for this annual Physics / Humanities Center partnership, author-scholar Kimmerer critically examines the notion of serving "We the People" as the foundation of environmental protection. Who are those People? What does it mean to be a person? She explores the indigenous concepts of personhood and reciprocity as a means to expand the circle of citizenship to include justice for the land. This event is co-sponsored by the Humanities Center.

The Thursday evening lecture is free and open to the public. Kimmerer also leads a focused workshop the following morning, which requires RSVP by 9/20/19.

Additional supporters:

  • Art and Music Histories
  • Biology
  • Native American Studies
  • Religion
  • Women's and Gender Studies

 

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Brandon

Oct 4, 2019, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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TBD by Cacey Bester

Oct 10, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

202 and 204 Physics Building

TBD by Cacey Bester, Swathmore College.

 

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Jay

Oct 11, 2019, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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Lights Out: The Rise and Fall of Scientific Authority by Robert Crease, Stony Brook University

Oct 17, 2019, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

202 and 204 Physics Building

"Lights Out: The Rise and Fall of Scientific Authority" by Robert Crease, Stony Brook University.

Hosts: Peter Saulson and Eric Schiff

Abstract: Over the past 400 years, the US and other nations have built up what is now in effect a global scientific workshop which has made great contributions to human life. What went wrong? How has mistrust of science, its institutions, and its findings become an established feature of the political landscape? It is tempting to think that scientific authority is natural and will soon reassert itself, like a sturdy, self-righting boat knocked over by a rogue wave. But as I argue in The Workshop and the World: What Ten Thinkers Can Teach Us about Science and Authority, the very strengths of science create vulnerabilities that allow detractors to question scientific findings with a veneer of plausibility. In this talk I will review some experiences of early proponents of the authority of science, the resistance that they encountered, and how they responded, in order to help understand and confront modern-day science denial. 

 Co-Sponsored by the Department of Physics and the Humanities Center.

 

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Sufi Zafar, IBM

Oct 18, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

202 Physics Building

Sufi Zafar, IBM

Host: Liviu Movileanu/Eric Schiff

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Asad

Oct 18, 2019, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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Qingkun Liu, Cornell

Oct 25, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

202 Physics Building

Qingkun Liu, Cornell

Host: Lisa Manning

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Goksu

Nov 1, 2019, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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Daria Atkinson, U Mass Amherst: When your filaments are fibers: the geometry and elasticity of filament bundles

Nov 8, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

202 Physics Building

Daria Atkinson, U Mass Amherst

Host: Chris Santangelo

 

Title: When your filaments are fibers: the geometry and elasticity of filament bundles

Abstract: Filamentous and columnar assemblies are ubiquitous in physical systems, from microscopic and biological materials, such as discotic liquid crystals and biopolymer bundles, to familiar, macroscopic materials like yarns, cables, and ropes.  Ordered ground states in filament bundles, however, are highly geometrically constrained, and we show that only two families of filament textures permit equidistance between the constituent filaments---the developable domains, which can bend, but not twist, and the helical domains, which can twist uniformly, but not bend.  The elastic response of bent and twisted filament bundles that cannot access equidistant ground states, such as those formed by DNA plasmids under confinement, is then doubly geometrically frustrated---the presence of twist frustrates crystalline order in the bundle cross-section, and the presence of bend couples any compromise structure to the filament texture. Because of this, the global response of non-equidistant filament bundles to deformations cannot adequately be described by a linearized elastic energy. To describe non-equidistant systems, we derive a geometrically nonlinear, coordinate invariant theory for the elasticity of filamentous materials, and discuss the response of hexagonally coordinated domains to the imposition of non-equidistant geometries.

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Kenny

Nov 8, 2019, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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Marc Miskin, U Penn

Nov 15, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

202 Physics Building

Marc Miskin, U Penn

Host: Joey Paulson

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Eva

Nov 15, 2019, 12:30 PM-1:30 PM

208 Physics Building

Contact: Judah Unmuth-Yockey

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Pierre-Thomas Brun, Princeton

Dec 6, 2019, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

202 Physics Building

Pierre-Thomas Brun, Princeton

Host: Joey Paulson

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TBD by Ricardo Pendco, Carnegie Melon

Jan 23, 2020, 3:30 PM-4:45 PM

202 and 204 Physics Building

TBD by Riccardo Penco, Carnegie Melon